Health Sensors & Trackers Portable Diagnostics

Top 10 Healthcare Wearables For A Healthy Lifestyle

There are thousands of devices and gadgets on the healthcare wearable market which could help you live a healthier and better life, although it is not easy to choose. Let me show you my top choices when it comes to health wearables and trackers.

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Navigenics: What my genome tells me to do

A few months ago, Navigenics.com offered me to analyze my saliva sample and genome. I happily accepted the offer and was curious to see what they could tell me. After graduating from medical school, I will start PhD training in personalized genetics this September so I’m quite into this emerging field of medicine.

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I sent my saliva sample back to their laboratory this January and received the results in about 3-4 weeks.

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I clicked on View my results and saw what kind of risks I have for certain medical conditions such as glaucoma, heart disease, prostate cancer, Crohn’s disease or osteoarthritis (9 conditions all together).

When I check one medical condition, I see something like that:

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They tell me my risk compared to the whole population.

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And how that medical condition is affected by environmental and genetic factors.

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And if I’m interested in the particular single nucleotide polymorphism they analyzed, I can check the details.

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Pros:

  • The information this service provided me with was useful and I will change some things in my lifestyle.
  • I can talk with a genetic counselor to discuss the results of my genetic variations.
  • I can print the results and share it with my doctor through an understandable report that mentions the references on which they based my risk percentages.
  • They help me what I can do in order to lower my risks for specific conditions. They also let me know things that prevent multiple conditions on the Navigenics panels.
  • Each condition is covered in details (causes, symptoms, treatments, etc.). This information is powered by Mayo Clinic.
  • I can find support groups or more information on prevention.

Cons:

  • Let’s say 3 SNPs tell me I have elevated risk for heart disease. But next year, they will discover 4 new ones that defend me from this condition. So Navigenics, just like any other similar companies, can only tell me risk percentages that might change a lot in the future.
  • For example, if based on my genomic results, I have elevated risk for heart disease, what I can do to lower this risk? Exercises, healthy lifestyle, etc. Things you can tell me without analyzing my genome. Though it’s not the fault of the service, but of the state genetics is in at the moment.
  • It’s still way too expensive compared to what I get for my money as the results cannot really be used for medical decisions  (I got a free package so I know I shouldn’t say that).
  • Well, a few genetic tests can be useful when making medical decisions, but such tests should be ordered only by medical professionals. Or if not, at least genetic counseling should be for free as patients need serious guidance when reading the results of their genomic variations. (Update: Navigenics provides free genetic counseling for all Health Compass members and 1 hour of free counseling for all Insight members. And you can order the tests through a medical professional or on your own.)
  • I think I can handle many things but it was almost impossible for me to understand which documents I have to send back to the lab with my saliva sample. A step-by-step video tutorial would be useful.

I’m thankful to the Team of Navigenics.com for showing me how their service works in action. I’m impressed and looking forward to seeing how they can make their service even better.

PeRSSonalized Medicine: A free tool to track medical information

We’ve recently had a long discussion on Twitter about why many doctors are not open to these web 2.0 tools. There is no question, they don’t have enough time to use these even if they were designed to help them save time and effort.

That’s why we’ve been working hard on Webicina.com to come up with a free tool that helps those users who cannot spend much time online (e.g. medical professionals). PeRSSonalized Medicine helps them track medical journals, blogs, news and web 2.0 services really easily and creates one personalized place where they can follow international medical content without having a clue what RSS is about.

Webicina.Com

Being up-to-date is crucial for medical professionals, but it takes time and effort. Sitting in a library with a few medical papers is not a proper solution any more. Learning to use an RSS reader is not that easy for those who don’t spend much time online.

PeRSSonalized Medicine is a free tool that lets you select your favourite resources and read the latest news and articles in one personalized place. You can create your own “medical journal” and as we are totally open to suggestions, let us add the journals, blogs and websites that you would like to follow.

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Click on “Personalize It” to hide the resources you don’t want to follow.

You don’t have to register to use it, but if you want to make sure it will save your settings, you can register in a few seconds here.

Now you can follow:

  • Medical journals
  • Medical blogs
  • Medical news
  • Medical Media including Youtube channels, Friendfeed rooms or Del.icio.us tags

One more thing. The developer behind PeRSSonalized Medicine and the whole Webicina platform is Gergő Vargyai. Many thanks to him for his ownderful job!

As always, we are open to suggestions so please let us know which resources to add to the database.

Further reading: