Social Media in Clinical Practice: The Handbook

Since Springer published my book, Social Media in Clinical Practice, I have received amazing feedback from e-patients and medical professionals worldwide who found my handbook to be very helpful in their professional and personal lives. Here are a few lines about the book:

The number of patients using social media and the number of applications and solutions used by medical professionals online have been sky-rocketing in the past few years, therefore the rational behind creating a well-designed, clear and tight handbook of practical examples and case studies with simple pieces of suggestions about different social media platforms is evident.

While the number of e-patients is rising, the number of web-savvy doctors who can meet the expectations of these new generations of patients is not, this huge gap can only be closed by providing medical professionals with easily implementable, useful and primarily practical pieces of advice and suggestions about how they should use these tools or at least what they should know about these, so then when an e-patient has an internet-related question, they will know how to respond properly.

As all medical professionals regardless of their medical specialties will meet e-patients, this issue with growing importance will affect every medical professionals which means there is a huge need for such a easily understandable handbook.​

Here you can check out the detailed descriptions of each chapter.

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Future of Medicine

Top Trends And Technologies Shaping Medicine in 2015!

It was an extraordinary year for technological improvements in medicine & healthcare.

Translate medical jargon on any web page!

I just came across a very interesting website Iodine.com where you can install a Google Chrome plugin which automatically translates medical jargon into more common expressions on any website. For example, while reading an article it turns words such as epistaxis into nosebleed.

It can also give you crowdsourced data and experience about drugs and drug interactions.

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My Wearable Health Trackers: Viatom CheckMe

In this edition of my series about wearable health trackers that I use, I have already described TinkéAliveCor, Pebble, Tickr Run and Withings. Now here is a new device from Viatom Technology that I have been testing for some time now.

The team kindly sent me a CheckMe which I have been using to measure my body temperature, ECG, pulse, oxygen saturation and sleep almost on a daily basis. This is the first device I have used which includes so many measurements at once.

It can measure:

  • oxygen saturation
  • pulse
  • perfusion index
  • ECG including QRS distance and regularity
  • body temperature
  • sleep quality + oxygen saturation
  • physical activities
  • blood pressure (indirectly)

It gives feedback about the results with a happy or sad smiley indicating whether we should get checked ourselves with a medical professional based on a measurement.

Although the way I have to wear it for measuring sleep  quality is not really comfortable, the data it gives me are very much detailed, plus finally I could see how my oxygen saturation changes during the night.

To be honest, there might be prettier devices out there with better background light for the screen, but for me, the fact that I can measure all these vital signs in quite a good quality led to keep on using the device on a daily basis.

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I also talk about Viatom in two of my recent videos: