FutureMed Day 2: Data and The Future of Oncology

FutureMed is going on and there is a reason it’s called the sleepless university, so it’s a challenge finding time to write my compilations.

Also see Medgadget and the Futuremed Magazine for recaps. And here is day 1.

Day 2 was centered around big data in healthcare, the future of computing and oncology.

  • Neil Jacobstein thinks artificial intelligence will be integrated sooner in medicine and healthcare than we thought. One of the first attempts in this area was a quick medical reference project started back in 1980 by firstdatabank.com.
  • Imagine that nanoparticles releasing oxygen during heart attack could save lives.
  • Dan Barry talked about robotics and 3D printing. Key line: I move therefore I am.
  • Brad Templeton described automobiles that run without human control and how they will change the future of transportation by freeing up parking spaces and lowering the number of cars.
  • Larry Smarr presented how you can quantify your body.
  • Focusatwill creates music that is perfect for your brain while working increasing the time period for which you can focus.
  • Malariaspot tries to crowdsource malaria diagnostics.
  • I had a chance to discuss the use of IBM Watson in healthcare with Martin Kohn. Watson will not replace doctors but can facilitate medical decision making.
  • Jack Andraka also talked who won the 2012 Intel Science Fair grand prize with a pancreatic test that is 168 times faster, 26,000 times less expensive, and over 400 times more sensitive than the current diagnostic tests. Here is what happened when he won it:

David from Prometheus shows how an AI robot might work in the future:

Dan Barry, 3 times astronaut, said in the future of dentistry, we will print the patient's jaw to show what will happen to them.
Dan Barry, 3 times astronaut, said in the future of dentistry, we will print the patient’s jaw to show what will happen to them.
An example of a sensual robot.
An example of a sensual robot.
Almost anything can be 3D printed.
Almost anything can be 3D printed.
This is a 3D printer, could be used at home too.
This is a 3D printer, could be used at home too.
Using a Da Vinci surgical robot actually requires some kind of video game skills as well.
Using a Da Vinci surgical robot actually requires some kind of video game skills therefore it’s really easy using it.
Participants, including me, play with anything they find such as a heat camera.
Participants, including me, play with anything they find such as a heat camera.