Crowdsourcing A Mom’s Medical Diagnosis: Help is needed!

My readers know well that I’ve been speaking about the use of crowdsourcing in medicine and healthcare for years and I do this in practice every single day through my medical Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Friendfeed communities. Once I even managed to crowdsource a rare diagnosis through these networks. Now I turn to you again in order to solve a medical mystery of a mother.

In a nutshell, a postpartum mother with no seizure or high blood pressure history suddenly developing malignant high blood pressure plus a new onset seizure disorder of complex partial seizures. She is being treated at Stanford, but still there is no final diagnosis. Here is the Facebook page the husband created and the details:

In my layman’s language, we have this previously very healthy woman who has a difficult third pregnancy. She has preclampsia during her pregnancy. She delivers the baby and then her blood pressure does not normalize (as would be expected with a preclampsia patient) but her blood pressure proceeds to get worse–to the point were she has a high-blood pressure-induced eclamptic seizure in her sleep seven weeks after the birth of her baby. She then starts to gets partial complex seizures (the lip smacking kind) in her sleep; that happen every six or seven weeks. She’ll get these partial complex seizures for maybe seven nights in a row before they stop, only to have them return in another six weeks or so. This pattern of seizure clusters is pretty consistent. The patient has been extensively worked up at Stanford and other places, with everything coming back negative–except for a recent diagnosis of potential Lyme’s exposure.  We have all these specialists that don’t know what to make of this very distinct profile–a postpartum mother with no seizure or high blood pressure history suddenly developing malignant high blood pressure plus a new onset seizure disorder of complex partial seizures–that cluster, are only nocturnal, and go dormant for six weeks before reappearing. Yes, the patient shows some Lyme’s exposure but the regular physicians at Stanford are just dismissive of a diagnosis of Lyme’s disease in general.

History of Present Illness is here.

Complete set of medical files are here.